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Since the 1980s, Monsanto has become the world leader in genetic modification of seeds and has won 674 biotechnology patents, more than any other company, according to U. This means that farmers must buy new seed every year.

Louis–based corporation into the largest seed company in the world. Paul Bremer’s last acts as head of the Coalition Provisional Authority was an order stipulating that “farmers shall be prohibited from re-using seeds of protected varieties.” Monsanto has said that it has no interest in doing business in Iraq, but should the company change its mind, the American-style law is in place. As recently as 1980, no genetically modified crops were grown in the U. These samples tested positive for Monsanto’s Roundup Ready technology.Freese says he has been told of many cases in which Monsanto investigators showed up at a farmer’s house or confronted him in his fields, claiming he had violated the technology agreement and demanding to see his records.According to Freese, investigators will say, “Monsanto knows that you are saving Roundup Ready seeds, and if you don’t sign these information-release forms, Monsanto is going to come after you and take your farm or take you for all you’re worth.” Investigators will sometimes show a farmer a photo of himself coming out of a store, to let him know he is being followed.Others do, but ignore the stipulation rather than throw away a perfectly usable product. seeds to get mixed in with traditional varieties when seeds are cleaned by commercial dealers for re-planting. seeds and doesn’t want them on his land, it’s a safe bet he’ll get a visit from Monsanto’s seed police if crops grown from G. What they may not know is that the company now profoundly influences—and one day may virtually control—what we put on our tables. Many more products have been developed or are in the pipeline, including seeds for sugar beets and alfalfa. agenda, Monsanto is buying up conventional-seed companies. Another reason for their attraction is convenience.Still others say that they don’t use Monsanto’s genetically modified seeds, but seeds have been blown into their fields by wind or deposited by birds. The seeds look identical; only a laboratory analysis can show the difference. For most of its history Monsanto was a chemical giant, producing some of the most toxic substances ever created, residues from which have left us with some of the most polluted sites on earth. The company is also seeking to extend its reach into milk production by marketing an artificial growth hormone for cows that increases their output, and it is taking aggressive steps to put those who don’t want to use growth hormone at a commercial disadvantage. In 2005, Monsanto paid

Louis–based corporation into the largest seed company in the world. Paul Bremer’s last acts as head of the Coalition Provisional Authority was an order stipulating that “farmers shall be prohibited from re-using seeds of protected varieties.” Monsanto has said that it has no interest in doing business in Iraq, but should the company change its mind, the American-style law is in place. As recently as 1980, no genetically modified crops were grown in the U. These samples tested positive for Monsanto’s Roundup Ready technology.

Freese says he has been told of many cases in which Monsanto investigators showed up at a farmer’s house or confronted him in his fields, claiming he had violated the technology agreement and demanding to see his records.

According to Freese, investigators will say, “Monsanto knows that you are saving Roundup Ready seeds, and if you don’t sign these information-release forms, Monsanto is going to come after you and take your farm or take you for all you’re worth.” Investigators will sometimes show a farmer a photo of himself coming out of a store, to let him know he is being followed.

Others do, but ignore the stipulation rather than throw away a perfectly usable product. seeds to get mixed in with traditional varieties when seeds are cleaned by commercial dealers for re-planting. seeds and doesn’t want them on his land, it’s a safe bet he’ll get a visit from Monsanto’s seed police if crops grown from G. What they may not know is that the company now profoundly influences—and one day may virtually control—what we put on our tables. Many more products have been developed or are in the pipeline, including seeds for sugar beets and alfalfa. agenda, Monsanto is buying up conventional-seed companies. Another reason for their attraction is convenience.

Still others say that they don’t use Monsanto’s genetically modified seeds, but seeds have been blown into their fields by wind or deposited by birds. The seeds look identical; only a laboratory analysis can show the difference. For most of its history Monsanto was a chemical giant, producing some of the most toxic substances ever created, residues from which have left us with some of the most polluted sites on earth. The company is also seeking to extend its reach into milk production by marketing an artificial growth hormone for cows that increases their output, and it is taking aggressive steps to put those who don’t want to use growth hormone at a commercial disadvantage. In 2005, Monsanto paid $1.4 billion for Seminis, which controlled 40 percent of the U. market for lettuce, tomatoes, and other vegetable and fruit seeds. By using Roundup Ready soybean seeds, a farmer can spend less time tending to his fields. But out in the American countryside, Monsanto’s no-holds-barred tactics have made it feared and loathed.

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Louis–based corporation into the largest seed company in the world. Paul Bremer’s last acts as head of the Coalition Provisional Authority was an order stipulating that “farmers shall be prohibited from re-using seeds of protected varieties.” Monsanto has said that it has no interest in doing business in Iraq, but should the company change its mind, the American-style law is in place. As recently as 1980, no genetically modified crops were grown in the U. These samples tested positive for Monsanto’s Roundup Ready technology.Freese says he has been told of many cases in which Monsanto investigators showed up at a farmer’s house or confronted him in his fields, claiming he had violated the technology agreement and demanding to see his records.According to Freese, investigators will say, “Monsanto knows that you are saving Roundup Ready seeds, and if you don’t sign these information-release forms, Monsanto is going to come after you and take your farm or take you for all you’re worth.” Investigators will sometimes show a farmer a photo of himself coming out of a store, to let him know he is being followed.Others do, but ignore the stipulation rather than throw away a perfectly usable product. seeds to get mixed in with traditional varieties when seeds are cleaned by commercial dealers for re-planting. seeds and doesn’t want them on his land, it’s a safe bet he’ll get a visit from Monsanto’s seed police if crops grown from G. What they may not know is that the company now profoundly influences—and one day may virtually control—what we put on our tables. Many more products have been developed or are in the pipeline, including seeds for sugar beets and alfalfa. agenda, Monsanto is buying up conventional-seed companies. Another reason for their attraction is convenience.Still others say that they don’t use Monsanto’s genetically modified seeds, but seeds have been blown into their fields by wind or deposited by birds. The seeds look identical; only a laboratory analysis can show the difference. For most of its history Monsanto was a chemical giant, producing some of the most toxic substances ever created, residues from which have left us with some of the most polluted sites on earth. The company is also seeking to extend its reach into milk production by marketing an artificial growth hormone for cows that increases their output, and it is taking aggressive steps to put those who don’t want to use growth hormone at a commercial disadvantage. In 2005, Monsanto paid $1.4 billion for Seminis, which controlled 40 percent of the U. market for lettuce, tomatoes, and other vegetable and fruit seeds. By using Roundup Ready soybean seeds, a farmer can spend less time tending to his fields. But out in the American countryside, Monsanto’s no-holds-barred tactics have made it feared and loathed.

.4 billion for Seminis, which controlled 40 percent of the U. market for lettuce, tomatoes, and other vegetable and fruit seeds. By using Roundup Ready soybean seeds, a farmer can spend less time tending to his fields. But out in the American countryside, Monsanto’s no-holds-barred tactics have made it feared and loathed.

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