Teenage dating violence prevention

Thus, they may have implications for prevention program, but they may also be outcomes that have implications for treatment.

Key risk factors consistently found in the literature to be associated with inflicting dating violence include the following: holding norms accepting or justifying the use of violence in dating relationships (Malik et al., 1997; O'Keefe, 1997); having friends in violent relationships (Arriaga & Foshee, 2004); exposure to violence in one's family and community violence (Foo & Margolin, 1995, O'Keefe, 1997; Schwartz et al., 1997); alcohol and drug use (O'Keeffe et al., 1986; Silverman et al., 2001); and a having a history of aggression (Riggs & O'Leary, 1989, Chase et al., 1998).

Since you can't always count on teens to stay away from guns, you have to keep guns away from them.

Reviewed By: Adolescent Interest Group Last Reviewed: August 2013Sources: Below are links PAMF accessed when researching this topic.

Fundamental problems exist, however, in asserting gender parity regarding relationship violence.

Most obvious is the greater physical harm that can be inflicted by male violence due to males' often greater size and strength.

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Also, teens are attracted to guns and see guns as symbols of power.These rates are higher when verbal abuse is included in the definition.Teen dating violence appears to parallel violence in adult relationships in that it exists on a continuum ranging from verbal abuse to rape and murder (Sousa, 1999).Targets of abuse are also more likely to contemplate or attempt suicide.Here are some consequences the target may experience: Online courses provide key info on bullying, dating violence Two interactive distance-learning courses, Bullying 101 and Teen Dating Violence 101, provide key information about bullying, cyber bullying, and dating violence and explain how to create safe, healthy environments and relationships.

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